Learning to Live Again (with a side order of pant-wetting adrenaline) at Lusty Glaze


It's been a bit of a year. 


Actually it's been a bit of a trio of years.


(And actually that is a bit of an understatement.)



Footprints in the sand
Learning to live again


Tough Times

Sometimes when life is indescribably tough it stops you in your tracks and smacks you off course. It steals every ounce of your confidence to the point where you need friends by your side for the simplest of daily tasks. And sometimes that daily task is just breathing in an out. 

Your energies, both mental and physical are sapped by the dark terror engulfling you. The world continues to revovle on the outside of course, but for those affected time stands still in their trapped isolation and it's so very hard to envisage an end, or a way out.

And then there is the outcast-like shame and the crushing grief of your life as you know it lost, and sometimes there is guilt and days of wondering if things might have been different if... and the frustration of the random injustice burns in your heart and on top of everything else you have to face those who disbelieve: the conspiracy theorists.


Time Out

And so it was that my new partner PG and I had shared experiences of life in recent times: 
He, a doctor hospitalised and critical with Covid-19, squaring up to death as his body fought pneumonia, a white blood cell storm, astronomic blood pressure and now the rollercoaster of the legacy of the illness. You can read his story in the press here.

I, a couple of years previously, picking my way out of a half-life-long marriage and through a subsequent thorny and protracted divorce.


Support

We all have so very much to be grateful for as we all walk towards the future, even if it sometimes doesn't feel that way. The secret is not looking back but focussing only on the light at the end of the tunnel. And then with the culmination of millions of tiny, faltering, often arduous steps in the right direction with support from many friends, family and professionals, you will get there, wherever 'there' is.

So when PG and I, having recently formed a social bubble, had a chance to attend a press event at Lusty Glaze Beach (no, not Lustful Gaze!) Luxury Yurt Collection, we thought it might be just what the doctor ordered, and indeed needed!

Lusty Glaze Covid-safe pop up yurt collection

Learning to Live, Laugh, Love Again (with a side order of pant-wetting adrenaline)

Neither of us are ones to put our needs first, or to want to spend time away from our girls, but we have recently been reminded that each of us has to prioritise our own recovery and safeguard our energies first before looking after others. Finding love in your 50s is something that feels precious and worthy of nurturing, so we packed our swimmers along with some trepidation and heading to the secluded cove near Newquay in Cornwall. 


Learning to live again at Lusty Glaze 

I think we both thought we'd take things easy, enjoy some delicious locally sourced seafood, enjoy a little glass of wine and spend a few hours sitting in deck chairs by our yurt, watching the waves massage the empty golden sands and sleeping many hours under the stars. Neither of us has ventured out much of late, PG as he is convalescing and I because I've been shielding Natty, and neither of us would yet feel that a hotel stay was suitable. But this mostly outdoor location felt safe, particularly as the owner Tracey has been shielding herself.

PG still gets breathless after exercise, his lungs took quite a battering, so with our water sport experience being at approximately zero and our combined fitness levels not being much more, we had discounted the idea of a sea swim or surf lesson.


Donning a wetsuit and getting ready for my adrenaline shot!


Fast forward 3 hours on Monday afternoon and we were both wetsuited up to the hilt and sitting astride a very powerful jet ski. We felt nothing but complete trust in the way the Waverunner Safari team taught us and led the way. PG said later that they had made us feel as welcome as the most experienced surf dude, that their trust in his ability to brave the waters and have a go had boosted his confidence no end. 

This was what we had both needed. The cool waters and fresh winds gave us a jolt of energy, and our squeals as we crashed over the waves must have given our lungs a workout that the NHS Covid-19 rehab teams would have been proud of. 


PG relaxing outside the beach hut bathroom


A Safe Slice of Paradise

Back on dry land, and thankful for being alive, we luxuriated in warm showers in our own converted beach hut, just a stone's throw away from our simple but cosy yurt. We laughed hard as we recounted the unexpected sea safari while peeling each other out of skin-tight wetsuits and rinsing the salt from our skin. This had certainly been an experience that not only made you feel good to be alive, but reminded you via every sense that you still were. 


Richard tells us of his culinary journey


Our evening ended with tailor-made cocktails by Topher, a beautiful meal cooked by former Masterchef contestant Richard and a lovely little dance to gentle live acoustic music. The evening was rounded off with a natter by the fire pit on the shore before falling asleep to the sound of the waves crashing and sea breeze lapping our tent.


Our safe slice of paradise for the night


This secluded privately-owned beach is reached via 133 steps carved into the cliff, which at once makes it safe and sheltered, although not easily accessible. It required some effort for us to reach, but it was worth it, as so often the best things in life are. And when you've faced the prospect of never doing those things again, you realise the true meaning of gratitude.


Thank you Lusty Glaze.


PG ready for his hearty English breakfast by the shore


Soaking in the early morning sun on a near empy beach.



* We were gifted a night for two with meals and a jet ski safari at Lusty Glaze Yurt Collection to compensate for our time in writing this article.


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